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SAN FRANCISCO DECORATOR SHOWCASE MAGAZINE   •   May, 2014

David Armour Architecture was pleased to support the San Francisco Decorator Showcase again this year, joining with the city’s fine design, architecture & real estate communities to raise funds for the San Francisco University High School Financial Aid Program (www.sfuhs.org). 26 interior and landscape design firms were selected to transform spaces within the 9,000-square-foot mansion at 3660 Jackson Street into a design of their choosing. The 1907 home — first built for Rose and Alfred Sutro — boasts immense picture windows and gracious rooms that beautifully highlighted the designers’ striking contrasts in paint and pattern and elegant graphic finishes. We hope everyone got to see it! In addition, DAA was honored to enjoy a special private evening as guests of Sotheby’s agent Rebecca Schumacher at their spectacular Sotheby’s Decorator Showcase Party – thanks, Rebecca!

All the funds raised through the Decorator Showcase go directly to support the San Francisco University High School (UHS) Financial Aid Program, enabling over 20% of UHS students to receive financial aid.

View interior photos of the 2014 house at sf.curbed.com

news

SF CHRONICLE: VICTORIAN IN NOE VALLEY METICULOUSLY RESTORED   •   April, 2013

BY JORDAN GUINN

David Armour saw a chance to revive history when he purchased 536 Alvarado St. in 2009. The principal of ARMOUR+VOKIC started gutting the Noe Valley Victorian immediately upon closing the deal. The nine-room home now features new plumbing and electrical systems, as well as seismic upgrades and a reimagined facade. "When I bought it, it was asbestos siding and aluminum windows," Armour said. "We did a sympathetic Victorian facade to reintegrate it into the block." Armour looked at the surrounding homes to determine what the exterior should look like. The exterior now boasts muted grays with white and blue accents. "There are 12 houses on the block that were all built at the same time, and among those there are four standard types that all alternate; the design is based off that," he said. Mindful to keep the spirit of the Victorian alive, Armour looked to re-create period details while updating the interior. Pocket doors and coved ceilings based on the original dimensions were crafted for the living room, while skylights in the kitchen and above the staircase are among the contemporary finishes. A full attic spanned the top of the house when Armour bought the property. While rebuilding the staircase, builders installed a skylight to illuminate the space. "Before, the staircase was really dark. Now it acts like an atrium, brightening the house," Armour said. Armour also installed circular windows on either side of the top floor's landing area to add character to the walls. Downstairs, the rebuilt kitchen comes with tile floors laid out in a herringbone pattern and a center island with a marble countertop. Bay windows provide additional space in the living room and the formal dining room has recessed lighting in its coved ceiling. While redesigning the home, Armour changed the floor plan. The top level of the four-bedroom home includes the master suite, as well as two additional bedrooms and a second bathroom. Built-in bookshelves, vaulted ceilings and a sitting area highlight the master bedroom, while the bathroom comes with dual vanities and a tile shower. Tile work can be found in all the bathrooms, and detailed color schemes reconnect the home to its Victorian heritage. A wine room, office, and fourth bedroom reside on the lower level, which features direct access to the garage and a laundry room. Outside the tri-level Victorian, a backyard offers a level grass pad elevated above the patio and fire pit. The length of the lot makes such a design possible, Armour said. The backyard also comes with high fences and young trees to provide additional privacy. The home is open Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. and is listed at $2.95 million. VIEW ARTICLE AT: SFChronicle.com and SFGate.com

news

SAN FRANCISCO DECORATOR SHOWCASE MAGAZINE   •   May, 2014

David Armour Architecture was pleased to support the San Francisco Decorator Showcase again this year, joining with the city’s fine design, architecture & real estate communities to raise funds for the San Francisco University High School Financial Aid Program (www.sfuhs.org). 26 interior and landscape design firms were selected to transform spaces within the 9,000-square-foot mansion at 3660 Jackson Street into a design of their choosing. The 1907 home — first built for Rose and Alfred Sutro — boasts immense picture windows and gracious rooms that beautifully highlighted the designers’ striking contrasts in paint and pattern and elegant graphic finishes. We hope everyone got to see it! In addition, DAA was honored to enjoy a special private evening as guests of Sotheby’s agent Rebecca Schumacher at their spectacular Sotheby’s Decorator Showcase Party – thanks, Rebecca!

All the funds raised through the Decorator Showcase go directly to support the San Francisco University High School (UHS) Financial Aid Program, enabling over 20% of UHS students to receive financial aid.

View interior photos of the 2014 house at sf.curbed.com

news

SF CHRONICLE: VICTORIAN IN NOE VALLEY METICULOUSLY RESTORED   •   April, 2013

BY JORDAN GUINN

David Armour saw a chance to revive history when he purchased 536 Alvarado St. in 2009. The principal of ARMOUR+VOKIC started gutting the Noe Valley Victorian immediately upon closing the deal. The nine-room home now features new plumbing and electrical systems, as well as seismic upgrades and a reimagined facade. "When I bought it, it was asbestos siding and aluminum windows," Armour said. "We did a sympathetic Victorian facade to reintegrate it into the block." Armour looked at the surrounding homes to determine what the exterior should look like. The exterior now boasts muted grays with white and blue accents. "There are 12 houses on the block that were all built at the same time, and among those there are four standard types that all alternate; the design is based off that," he said. Mindful to keep the spirit of the Victorian alive, Armour looked to re-create period details while updating the interior. Pocket doors and coved ceilings based on the original dimensions were crafted for the living room, while skylights in the kitchen and above the staircase are among the contemporary finishes. A full attic spanned the top of the house when Armour bought the property. While rebuilding the staircase, builders installed a skylight to illuminate the space. "Before, the staircase was really dark. Now it acts like an atrium, brightening the house," Armour said. Armour also installed circular windows on either side of the top floor's landing area to add character to the walls. Downstairs, the rebuilt kitchen comes with tile floors laid out in a herringbone pattern and a center island with a marble countertop. Bay windows provide additional space in the living room and the formal dining room has recessed lighting in its coved ceiling. While redesigning the home, Armour changed the floor plan. The top level of the four-bedroom home includes the master suite, as well as two additional bedrooms and a second bathroom. Built-in bookshelves, vaulted ceilings and a sitting area highlight the master bedroom, while the bathroom comes with dual vanities and a tile shower. Tile work can be found in all the bathrooms, and detailed color schemes reconnect the home to its Victorian heritage. A wine room, office, and fourth bedroom reside on the lower level, which features direct access to the garage and a laundry room. Outside the tri-level Victorian, a backyard offers a level grass pad elevated above the patio and fire pit. The length of the lot makes such a design possible, Armour said. The backyard also comes with high fences and young trees to provide additional privacy. The home is open Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. and is listed at $2.95 million. VIEW ARTICLE AT: SFChronicle.com and SFGate.com

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